The acronym VIN actually stands for Vehicle Identification Number. They are actually utilized so as to identify motor vehicles. Each one is unique so it stands as the vehicle’s identity. At present, the usual VIN is made up of some 17 characters. What is quite fascinating is that they do not include the letters I, O, and Q.

The VIN is usually found at the upper left side of your vehicle’s dashboard. If you found it, you would see all 17 characters on it. The first character represents the nation of origin of your vehicle, although it could also stand for the final point of assembly. For example, J is for Japan, W is for Germany, 1 is for the US, and 2 is for Canada.

The next character is actually the code of the manufacturer. A is for Audi, B is for BMW, L is for Lincoln, and N is for Nissan. These are just a few. Of course, there are various characters for each one. The characters number four to eight are actually information or codes about the vehicle’s series, body type, restraint system, and engine code.

As per the ninth character, it is the so-called check digit. It could be a number from 0 to 9 or it could also be the letter X. This is called such for officers and experts in this field could actually know if you have tampered with your vehicle through this character.

The 10th character’s position actually indicates the model year. A is for 1980, B is for 1981, C is for 1982, D is for 1983, E is for 1984, F is for 1985, G is for 1986, H is for 1987, J is for 1988, K is for 1989, L is for 1990, M is for 1991, N is for 1992, P is for 1993, R is for 1994, S is for 1995, T is for 1996, V is for 1997, W is for 1998, X is for 1999, Y is for 2000, 1 is for 2001, 2 is for 2002, 3 is for 2003, 4 is for 2004, 5 is for 2005, 6 is for 2006, 7 is for 2007, 8 is for 2008, and 9 is for 2009.

The 11th character shows the place where the vehicle is assembled. If you see the number 9 in that position, it would mean that the vehicle has been assembled in Detroit, Michigan. The characters from the 12th to the 17th positions are the production sequence numbers.

It is important for you to be able to understand the VIN.

After all, it contains various pieces of information about your vehicle. It is also your vehicle’s unique identifier. Jaguar Parts and Jaguar Auto Parts are also unique when it comes to producing and dealing their Jaguar 420 parts and other Jaguar parts. In their comprehensive line up, they do also have brakes, service tools, and climate control parts.

Old cars don’t die, they just get resold. If you’re buying a used car, whether from a dealer or someone who put an ad in the paper, you’ll want to know as much about it as you can. Even without anyone trying to deceive you, the vehicle may have problems you can’t see from a simple visual inspection or even a short test drive.

A vehicle history report prepared by a third party is one way to know what you’re getting. Combining information from state DMVs and RMVs as well as police reports and other sources, a vehicle history report can give you a comprehensive overview of where the car’s been.

Here are some things to look for-or look out for-when you get a report on a vehicle. None of these things is necessarily a reason not to buy a car, but you shouldn’t make a decision without asking about anything you see on a vehicle history:

* Many owners. The more garages a car’s been in, the less likely it’s been lovingly cared for all its life. Not everyone is as assiduous about car care as you are. Rental cars and former taxis, for example, will often have undergone a lot of abuse, although they tend to be quite inexpensive.

* Location, location, location. Some parts of the country are more car-friendly than others. Winter storms (with their accompanying salted roads) can be rough on cars, as obviously can floods, excessive heat or even sea air. Cars that have been where these are common may have hidden damage.

* Name and description. Be sure the car in the report is the same as the car you’re looking at. Carefully reviewing the vehicle description is one way to avoid various types of vehicle fraud, like VIN cloning. A cloned vehicle involves using a vehicle identification number (VIN) from a legally owned, non-stolen vehicle to mask the identity of a similar make/ model stolen vehicle. Carfax reports include detailed descriptions of the vehicle, so you can make sure the car you’re reading about is the same as the one you’re looking at.

* Suspicious markings. Keep an eye out for records of body work that might indicate a prior unreported incident.

Vehicle history reports from Carfax are the most comprehensive available. The company’s database contains more than four billion records from thousands of public and private sources, including all Departments of Motor Vehicles (DMVs) in the United States and Canada and thousands of vehicle inspection stations, auto auctions, fleet management and rental agencies, automobile manufacturers, and fire and police departments.

Flooded Vehicle – is considered, a vehicle that was damaged by water level raised to seating level. Most flood damaged cars, trucks and SUVs are sent to a salvage yard, but some are cleaned up and put into the auto market where they’ll be bought by unsuspecting buyers who think they’re getting a great deal.

Flooded water leaves long lasting damage. Electrical and mechanical components will probably fail early. Mold and mildew can also create a serious problem. Any remaining warranty is voided. While buying a used car be on the lookout for these cars even if you don’t live in a flooded area, because dishonest people move them around. Here are some tips and points to detect flooded vehicles.

I) Get a Vehicle History Report
Enter the vehicle’s VIN number to get a history report. Carfax does a great job of researching a vehicle’s background, but a clean slate is not a 100% guarantee that the car or truck hasn’t suffered water damage. You can also contact CarSnaps and ask them for advice or request a vehicle background report.

II) Look for Moisture.
Look for moisture within the lights. Check the glove compartment, console and trunk and inspect them for any sign of dampness moisture or the dirt that looks like a leftover from a flood. Look under the hood for accumulated dirt or signs of rust. Check under the seats for signs of moisture.

III) Take a deep Sniff
This can really help in detecting flooded vehicles. Do you smell a sour, mildewy-like odor? Soaked seats, carpeting and other components are difficult to dry in a hurry, so there’s plenty of time for mold and mildew to grow, especially if the flood occurred in a hot and humid location.

IV) Look for Mismatched Interior Components
Does the carpeting look brand new or mismatched or too new for the vehicle? Do seat covers seem out of place with the carpeting? Components that don’t match-up might have been changed in a hurry after the vehicle was pulled from flood waters.

V) Request free advice from CarSnaps
Contact CarSnaps.com and request free advice from their qualified technicians who are there to help and it is free so there is nothing to lose.

VI) Let Your Technician Examine the Vehicle
Take the vehicle to a technician if possible and ask for a thorough examination. Experienced auto technicians see evidence of flood damage more often than most individuals do, so they know exactly what to look for.

VII) Turn it On and Go for a Drive
Turn the car on and check every electrical system possible, including the exterior and interior lights, the gauges, the clock and the audio system and the dash lights that display air bag and seat belt information. Go for a drive and test electrical components again to make sure they work correctly. 90% of the time you will be able to suspect an electrical problem with flooded vehicle unless it is repaired or electrical parts are not damaged which is very rare though.

Flooded vehicles should be avoided as much as possible even if seller tell you about the manufacturer warranty because warranty voids when a car goes through a flood. If you suspect a flooded vehicle walk away from it. Flooded vehicles are not worth the hassle they provide.

Auto and car theft is a crime. In truth, the term “motor vehicle theft” could actually be used to refer to instances where automobiles, buses, motorcycles, snowmobiles, trucks, and other similar means of transportation are stolen. You see, this crime is actually punishable as a felony. This is primarily because this kind of situation causes extreme emotional and economic distress to its victim and to the society as well.

Many automobiles and cars are being stolen every minute. And it could be reflected in the various terms and phrases that has arisen and created to refer to it. Carjacking is one term and it means stealing a vehicle while it is still occupied by the owner or the driver. Another one is joyriding and it refers to stealing a motor vehicle and then later on abandoning it.

Of course, there have been ways and actions that the authorities have come up with to assist consumers and customers with ways to ward off any attempts at stealing their vehicles. In the United States, it is required that motor vehicles have vehicle identification numbers (VIN) and they must be registered with a vehicle licensing authority. If a vehicle has a VIN, it makes reselling a stolen vehicle very hard.

As per statistics, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) claims that a motor vehicle is actually stolen every 25 seconds in the United States and the chances of recovering them dwindle to something much lower than 50 percent.

According to Larry Gamache of Carfax, “Car thieves go into car lots to find vehicles that match the cars they steal. They’ll take off the VIN plate and put it on one they just stole. Then they’ll sell it to someone who has no idea it’s a stolen vehicle.”

With that, it is important to note the VIN of your vehicle before you purchase a car. Try checking the VIN number on the dashboard and compare it with the car’s title documents. You can check it out for discrepancies. And if you find any, it means that something sure is wrong. Gamache also adds, “You should also match that number in other places, including under the hood and at the door jamb on the driver’s side.

Then check that vehicle ID number to make sure it matches in all three spots.”

Stealing cars could be rampant however it does not mean that you have to keep your vehicle looking bad and not maintained. You can find quality and impressive Ford Excursion parts and other Ford parts at Ford Parts and Ford Auto Parts. Its collection of Ford parts will surely give your vehicle a boost in performance for all parts have undergone strict quality control measures.